Category

Civil action

Business in GermanyCivil actionDebt collectionGoing to courtLitigation in Germany

Dodging Debts by Moving to the UK?

Has your German debtor moved to the UK and declared himself or herself bankrupt under the UK / British insolvency rules? Since we specialise in British-German legal matters, our firm very often gets enquiries from German individuals, companies or banks regarding a situation whereby a German individual has moved to the United Kingdom and declared bankruptcy in order to avoid paying their debts and liabilities back in Germany. Even further, it is quite common that…
Bernhard Schmeilzl
March 10, 2017
Business in GermanyCivil actionCriminal LawGerman LawGerman Tort LawLitigation in Germany

Putting Someone on Speaker Phone without telling them?

It's not only rude, but outright criminal In their piece about Speakerphone Etiquette, The Huffington Post recommends: "Always ask the person on the other end of the line if he or she minds being put on the speakerphone. Some people find them annoying and invasive." This is excellent advice, especially if you speak to Germans on the phone. Why so? Because a German might not only be annoyed to find out that somehas has secretly…
Bernhard Schmeilzl
February 8, 2017
Business in GermanyCivil actionLitigation in Germany

Chasing Debts in Germany

Some Practical Tips from German Litigation Experts GrafLegal If you are being owed money by a German debtor and this debtor refuses to pay even after having been served a dunning letter from a German lawyer, you will have to obtain a payment order which can then be enforced by a German bailiff (Gerichtsvollzieher) or by the German Court of Execution (Vollstreckungsgericht). Such a payment order is called "Vollstreckungstitel", or just "Titel". To obtain this…
Bernhard Schmeilzl
January 3, 2017
Civil actionGerman LawGerman Tort LawGoing to courtLitigation in Germany

No Win No Fee Agreements are Void in Germany

Contingency fee agreements with litigation lawyers are illegal in Germany No win no fee agreements (contingency fees) between a client and lawyer are prohibited under German law. This has always been the tradition of German law (more here). The reasoning behind this rule is that German lawyers shall not undercut each other, because this would lead to poorly financed law offices providing very poor services to their clients. Also, German lawyers shall not be under the…
Bernhard Schmeilzl
July 26, 2016
Civil actionGerman Corporate LawGerman Labor LawGerman LawGerman ProbateGerman Succession & Inheritance LawGerman Tax LawGerman Tort LawLitigation in Germany

Expert Reports on German Law

As a full service German and English law firm, established in 2003, and the editors of the expert blog on German civil procedure rules we are often asked to provide English Law Firms with an expert report based on issues of German Law. Bernhard Schmeilzl, a bilingual Lawyer who qualified in 2001 (admitted to the Munich Bar) and is able to provide expert reports to be used in English litigation and arbitration cases based on…
Bernhard Schmeilzl
June 2, 2016
Civil actionGoing to courtLitigation in Germany

Compensation for a wrecked Car under the German Law of Torts

Car Accidents: How are Damages calculated under German Law? Each year, German police registers 2.2 million traffic accidents (for official 2016 stats see here). German insurers, lawyers and Courts are thus constantly faced with the question how to calculate damage claims after a car accident has occured. If the car can still be repaired, the matter is fairly simple. The Defendant must pay for the costs for a state of the art repair plus the…
Bernhard Schmeilzl
May 31, 2016
Civil actionGerman LawGerman Tort LawGoing to courtLitigation in Germany

German Law of Torts: Are Accident Victims entitled to a New House?

Can a disabled injured person claim for the predicted cost of accommodation or only the actual costs after they have been incurred? Under German law, a person who is impaired by an accident is entitled to adequate housing. The extent and amount necessary for adequate housing depends on what an impaired person would reasonably require. This can be determined by an expert, who will be appointed by a German court. However, a difficult and strongly…
Bernhard Schmeilzl
May 31, 2016
Civil actionGoing to courtLitigation in Germany

A German Claimant can’t be his own Witness

Civil Procedure Laws and actual Litigation Practice in German Court Rooms is very different from English or US Civil Trials Under the English Civil Procedure Rules, it is common practice that a Claimant provides a witness statement to the court. To the eyes of German lawyers and Judges, this is a strange concept, because German law does not allow parties to provide witness statements as evidence before the Court. Under section 447 German Civil Procedure…
Bernhard Schmeilzl
May 31, 2016
Civil actionGerman LawGerman Tort LawGoing to court

Does German Law of Torts know the Egg Shell Skull Rule?

Under English law of torts, a claimant is entitled to pursue a claim for injuries that have been sustained as a result of the negligence, even if their response to the damage they suffered was unusual or not predictable (e.g. due to brittle bone disease, haemophilia or a nervous disease of the injured person). This principle is known as the “egg shell skull” rule and means that the wrongdoer takes the claimant in the position they…
Bernhard Schmeilzl
April 19, 2016
Civil actionGoing to court

German Litigation Experts explain Civil Procedure Rules

How to win civil lawsuits in Germany Court procedures in Germany follow very different rules compared to Britain and the USA. There is, for instance, no pre-action protocol, no pre-trial discovery, no need for written witness statements, no direct examination of witnesses by the lawyers and - of course - no jury. Instead, there is a very extensive exchange of written statements to the court, followed by an -- in most cases comparatively brief --…
Bernhard Schmeilzl
December 23, 2015