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conveyancing Germany

Conveyancing GermanyGerman LawGerman Succession & Inheritance Law

Selling Property in Germany? Better hurry!

Corona Crisis will cause German Real Estate Prices to drop For two decades, the only way was up when it came to market value (Verkehrswert) of German houses, flats and apartments, especially in large German cities like Munich, Frankfurt or Berlin. In 2020, this will all change! Even before the Corona outbreak in Europe, the rise in German property prices was no longer as steep as in previous years, due to a combination of extensive…
Bernhard Schmeilzl
March 18, 2020
Conveyancing GermanyGerman Law

Searching for Property Information in the German Land Registry

How to find out who owns a specific plot of land in Germany Every week we get a number of enquiries regarding German property and how to obtain Land Registry information. Mostly from creditors who "have heard" that their debtor owns property in Germany. Or from a spouse entangled in divorce proceedings who fears that the other spouse is hiding property located somewhere in Germany. Or, of course, enquiries in connection with international succession and…
Bernhard Schmeilzl
September 25, 2014
Conveyancing GermanyGerman Law

Template of German Land Sale & Purchase Agreement

Buying real estate in Germany When you wish to sell or buy a house or apartment in Germany the agreement must be signed before a German notary (see sections 873 and 925 German Civil Code) because the German Land Registry will only accept instructions from such notary (details). We have explained the legal procedure of conveyancing in Germany here.   The parties must be extremely careful that the notarial agreement does contain the entire understanding between…
Bernhard Schmeilzl
July 3, 2013
Conveyancing Germany

Legal Guide to buying a House or Apartment in Germany

Buying Real Estate in Germany as a Foreigner Compared with the UK and the USA, relatively few Germans own their own home. As Guardian recently titled: "Brits buy homes, Germans rent". To rent an apartment or even a house is much more common in Germany, especially since a tenant (lessee) is extremely well protected by German law. A landlord cannot simply terminate a residential rental agreement but must have legitimate cause (Sec 573 German Civil…