Litigation Costs in Germany: Basic Principles and an Online Cost Calculator

By German Litigation Expert Bernhard H. Schmeilzl, LL.M. (Leicester), admitted to the Munich Bar and qualified to represent clients in Courts of Law throughout Germany Court fees (Gerichtskosten) in Germany are based on the value of the claim (Streitwert or … Continue reading

Forensic Accountant for Business Litigation in Germany

You need to understand German company accounts? In order to win a business or corporate law suit, understanding the numbers is often equally important as knowing the legal aspects of the case. The same is true if you plan to … Continue reading

Standard of Proof in German Civil Litigation

Is the Standard of Proof any different under German Law than English Law? The standard of proof in German civil litigation is defined in section 286 German Civil Procedure Rules (Zivilprozessordnung): Section 286: Evaluation of evidence at the court’s discretion and … Continue reading

German Litigation Experts explain Civil Procedure Rules

Court procedures in Germany follow very different rules compared to Britain and the USA. There is, for instance, no pre-action protocol, no pre-trial discovery, no need for written witness statements, no direct examination of witnesses by the lawyers and – … Continue reading

Prosecuted in Germany?

German defense lawyer Alexander Greithaner specialises in international criminal cases and represents foreign clients in all areas of criminal law. Due to his international family background he is fluent in English, Spanish and, of course, German. First things first: If … Continue reading

How to deal with Estates in Austria

Probate Proceedings in Austria are very different from those in Germany If a decedent who was not resident in Austria owned any assets in Austria at the time of his or her death, this Austrian Estate can only be accessed … Continue reading

Post-Contractual Non-Compete Clauses in German Employment Agreements

… and how to get rid of them Many employers want to prevent their employees to work for competitors when the employment ends. Under German labor law, this can be achieved by putting a post-contractual non-compete clause (nachvertragliches Wettbewerbsverbot) in … Continue reading

“I want to make a Gift to my Child in Germany…”

… but my son-in-law / daughter-in-law shall not benefit from such a gift or inheritance! Is that possible under German law? Yes, it certainly is possible. Spouses are sometimes under the impression that they have an automatic entitlement to any … Continue reading